Healing the Memories of Childhood Trauma and Depression

Childhood trauma is experienced by nearly everyone at some point in their lives. It can happen to a parent, a sibling, or an entire family unit. However it manifests, the result is the same: deep hurt that’s left untreated for too long. Depression, on the other hand, strikes most people at least once in their lives. It’s common and often difficult to detect until it’s too late. Fortunately, there are some things you can do to get back on track and regain your mental health.

What is Childhood Trauma?

Childhood trauma is a broad term used to describe events that occur during a child’s early years. These may include physical, emotional, social, and learning experiences. There are many reasons why childhood trauma occurs, including: Neglect – A parent who is physically or emotionally unhealthy, or who has a substance abuse problem, can leave a child unsupervised and with limited human interaction. Sibling Rivalry – A child who is close in age with a younger sibling may experience deep hurt when that child is abducted or dies. Childhood Abuse – Any kind of physical, emotional, or verbal mistreatment is called abuse. Examples include physical punishment, neglect, and harmful routines. Parental Alienation – A parent’s complete absence leaves a child feeling lonely, lost, and unsupported. Poor Interactions With The Law – A child who doesn’t know how to report a crime, get medical help, or properly access his/her Social Security number can become a victim of child abuse. Parents Who Are Overworked – A stressed out parent who can’t manage their stress well can leave their child with a parent. This can cause depression and anxiety in the child.

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Why does childhood trauma happen?

There are many reasons why childhood trauma happens, including: Poor Interactions With The Law – A child who doesn’t know how to report a crime, get medical help, or properly access his/her Social Security number can become a victim of child abuse. Poor Interactions With The Law – A child who doesn’t know how to report a crime, get medical help, or properly access his/her Social Security number can become a victim of child abuse. Caring For Two Children – A parent who is unable to properly take care of both children because of a work-related issue, a health issue, or another family matter may turn to drugs or alcohol to help them cope. Poor Interactions With The Law – A child who doesn’t know how to report a crime, get medical help, or properly access his/her Social Security number can become a victim of child abuse. Poor Interactions With The Law – A child who doesn’t know how to report a crime, get medical help, or properly access his/her Social Security number can become a victim of child abuse. Parents Who Are Overworked – A stressed out parent who can’t manage their stress well can leave their child with a parent. This can cause depression and anxiety in the child. Children Who Are Overprotected – A child who is overprotected feels safe and secure with everyone in the home. This can cause depression and anxiety in the child.

What to do about it?

There are a number of things you can do to help your child heal from childhood trauma. The most important one is to seek help if you’re experiencing symptoms. Talk to your doctor if you aren’t sure what to do.

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The Healing Process

The healing process for childhood trauma is slow, but sure-footing. Over time, memories of the trauma are processed and released. This process is sometimes referred to as deprogramming or rewiring the brain. Remember, the healing process for depression is also a journey. You may feel sad for a while, but eventually you’ll feel happy again.

Conclusion

Children experience trauma for a variety of reasons. The healing process is a process that is unique to each child. The first step toward healing is identifying what happened. The second step is to talk to your child about what happened. Talking to your child about the experience can help him/her deal better with the situation in the future. Knowing what happened and why your child is experiencing the way he/she is can open the door to healing.

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